Subject Descriptions - Subject Information


Calendar: 2017 Undergraduate
Faculty: Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health
Department: School of Biological Sciences



Subject Information
Subject Code BIOL320
Subject Name Molecular Cell Biology
Credit Points 8
Pre-Requisites BIOL214 & BIOL215
Co-Requisites Nil
Restrictions Nil
Equivalence Nil
Assessment Mid-session quiz 10%; Student Lab Book 1 7.5%; Scientific Report 15%; Student Lab Book 2 7.5%; Practical Exam 20%; Final Theory Exam 40%
General Subject Yes.

Subject Description
This subject covers many specific aspects of cell biology, including cell and tissue structure, protein sorting mechanisms, secretion, membrane transport, energetics, signal transduction, apoptosis, cellular and molecular genetics of development, the cell cycle and cancer. In addition, focused lab-based practicals are offered which will provide an understanding of the techniques used for studying cell biology. These include: cell and organelle isolation and analysis, growth of various cell types in aseptic culture, observation and manipulation of cellular functions and cell surface labelling and protein blotting.


Subject Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental importance of cellular structure and function to all life forms;
2. Demonstrate a broad understanding of many specific aspects of cell biology, including cell and tissue structure, protein sorting mechanisms, secretion, membrane transport, energetics, signal transduction, apoptosis, the cytoskeleton, the cell cycle and cancer;
3. Demonstrate proficiency in a range of cell biological techniques required for:
(i) cell isolation and analysis,
(ii) growth of various cell types in aseptic culture,
(iii) observation and manipulation of cellular functions, and
(iv) the purification of cellular organelles.

Extra Information
Generic Extra Information:
NOTE: The use of animals, animal tissues or animal-derived products (such as sera) is inherent and unavoidable, in order to achieve specific learning objectives. Students with conscientious objections to that use should not enrol in this subject.