Subject Descriptions - Subject Information


Calendar: 2019 Undergraduate
Faculty: Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts
Department: School of the Arts, English and Media

COSMOS mastered subject: Version 2000.01

Subject Information
Subject Code ENGL361
Subject Name The Modernists
Credit Points 6
Pre-Requisites 24cp at 200 level including 12cp ENGL
Co-Requisites None.
Restrictions None.
Equivalence ENGL253 ENGL264 ENGL338
Assessment 1. Exam - In class test 1,000 words 25% 2. Essay 2,500 words 40% 3. Exam 1,500 words 35%
General Subject Yes.
EFTSL (Non Weighted) 0.125
Non Weighted Student Contribution Amounts
Commonwealth Supported (HECS) Students Only
Pre-1997 Pre-2005 Post-2005 Post-2008 Post-2009 Post-2010
$ 820  $ 820  $ 820  $ 820  $ 820  $ 820 
Weighted Student Contribution Amounts
Commonwealth Supported (HECS) Students Only
Course
1771-Bachelor of Laws (Honours) (Direct Entry)
1777-Bachelor of Laws (Direct Entry)
1827-Bachelor of International Studies - Bachelor of Laws
1845-Bachelor of Information Technology - Bachelor of Laws
1852-Bachelor of Business Information Systems - Bachelor of Laws
760-Bachelor of Communication and Media Studies - Bachelor of Laws
770-Bachelor of Laws (Graduate Entry)
771-Bachelor of Arts - Bachelor of Laws
771H-Course information not Found
772-Bachelor of Creative Arts - Bachelor of Laws
773-Bachelor of Commerce - Bachelor of Laws
774-Bachelor of Mathematics - Bachelor of Laws
775-Bachelor of Science - Bachelor of Laws
775H-Course information not Found
775M-Course information not Found
776-Bachelor of Computer Science - Bachelor of Laws
778-Bachelor of Information and Communication Technology-Bachelor of Laws
779-Bachelor of Engineering - Bachelor of Laws
858-Bachelor of Journalism - Bachelor of Laws
Work Experience No
Tutorial Enrolment Information None.

Subject Availability
Session Autumn  (04-03-2019 to 27-06-2019)
Campus Batemans Bay
Delivery Method On Campus
Instance Name Class 1
Course Restrictions No restrictions
Contact Hours 1hr lecture, 2hr tutorial per week
Lecturer(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Coordinator(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Instance Comment  
Census Date 31-03-2019

Subject Availability
Session Autumn  (04-03-2019 to 27-06-2019)
Campus Shoalhaven
Delivery Method On Campus
Instance Name Class 1
Course Restrictions No restrictions
Contact Hours 1hr lecture, 2hr tutorial per week
Lecturer(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Coordinator(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Instance Comment  
Census Date 31-03-2019

Subject Availability
Session Autumn  (04-03-2019 to 27-06-2019)
Campus Southern Highlands
Delivery Method On Campus
Instance Name Class 1
Course Restrictions No restrictions
Contact Hours 1hr lecture, 2hr tutorial per week
Lecturer(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Coordinator(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Instance Comment  
Census Date 31-03-2019

Subject Availability
Session Autumn  (04-03-2019 to 27-06-2019)
Campus Wollongong
Delivery Method On Campus
Instance Name Class 1
Course Restrictions No restrictions
Contact Hours 1hr lecture, 2hr tutorial per week
Lecturer(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Coordinator(s) and
Cons. times
Anne Collett
Instance Comment  
Census Date 31-03-2019

Subject Description
This subject focuses on the theory and cultural production of modernism in the early decades of the 20th century. The modernists were a cohort of artists who felt that the social and technological developments of the 19th century required the development of new forms of artistic representation, hence Ezra Pound’s call to ‘Make it New!’ Literary texts by Woolf, Yeats, Joyce, Faulkner, Hemingway, Lawrence and T.S. Eliot (among others) will be read in conjunction with texts from science, psychology, art, music, literary and cultural theory.


Subject Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:
1. Identify the characteristics of modernist writing and the shared (and divergent) concerns of modernists; demonstrate understanding of the shift in values as represented in literary form from 19th to 20th centuries
2. Demonstrate understanding of the literary text as contributing to an intellectual and aesthetic debate that is both historical and on-going
3. Articulate and discuss (in written and oral form) the literary strategies the texts use to produce meaning
4. Write an essay that uses the tools of critical literary analysis to develop an argument/thesis that is 1) founded upon supportive evidence from primary texts 2) makes effective use of secondary materials 3) demonstrates awareness of and engages effectively with scholarship on the chosen topic and 4) demonstrates understanding of the context out of which these texts originate
5. Better articulate ideas in oral form, better respond appropriately to challenges made to those ideas, engage in seminar discussion


Textbook Information

Text book information is available via the UniShop website:



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